Reader Poll: “If you have a close friend or family member living in a homosexual relationship, do you feel obligated to include the “partner” in holiday gatherings and events?”

Reader Poll: “If you have a close friend or family member living in a homosexual relationship, do you feel obligated to include the “partner” in holiday gatherings and events?”

Here’s the question we asked our readers:

“If you have a close friend or family member living in a homosexual relationship, do you feel obligated to include the “partner” in holiday gatherings and events?”

Here’s how our readers responded:

56 Percent                   No, I don’t feel obligated at all

33 Percent                   Yes, I will invite the “partner”

11 Percent                   Feel guilty, but won’t invite

Emotions ran strong with this question, with at least one person describing those who wouldn’t invite the “partner” as being “closed-mind, unkind, and unchristlike.”  Others wrote to us and pointed out that when their children are involved, they will not appear to be condoning same-sex behavior by including the partner and making it appear as though such behavior were acceptable and normal.

One man who wrote to us gave us the example that he would not invite anyone who openly and even “proudly” manifest any destructive behavior – alcohol or drug abuse for example – to engage with his family.  He continued, “bringing the ‘partner’ is a statement that the gay family member believes that what he is doing is totally acceptable and right.  It isn’t and I won’t let it appear to my children that it is.”

Most seemed to agree that the gay family member was more than welcome, but they were not obligated to invite the partner.

2 Comments
  • Russell
    Posted at 00:16h, 08 December Reply

    Every family is dysfunctional. So, why not invite both gays to ur family gatherings? That way, you can truely put the “fun” in dys”fun”ction.

  • Meagan
    Posted at 21:52h, 17 December Reply

    Why not just invite them but not offer them a “room” and lay some ground rules, that way you get the best of both worlds? You are gracious to the guest, but not supporting a behavior you don’t believe in. Are they just a “behavior” or “bad choice” now and have lost their humanity? Not speaking to them is just going to reinforce the stereotype that people who don’t support their behavior are cruel. I know I’m going against the 2/3 of pollsters that probably won’t invite, and maybe what I’ve been saying so far sounds offensive. But, I used to stop speaking to people that did things I didn’t agree with, and in the end I felt horrible and didn’t have any friends. It just strengthened their conviction to do wrong, I would imagine I was the mean girl. With less and less people being guided by tradition and faith, you can no longer just shun people and hope that they’ll feel ashamed, you have to guide them gently back into truth–and you’ll never get that chance if you don’t associate with them.

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